Blog

Sun 27th November 2011

Posted on November 27, 2011 at 4:45 PM

This week has been the first week that, whilst walking around birding, it has felt more like winter than autumn. In the headland bushes there are practically no chiffs or crests calling, any overhead migration seems to be half-hearted and the expectation of rarities has slowly dissolved away. Autumn 2011 has passed and a winter of mourning has begun. Here's hoping that we get another cold spell at some point during the next three months, because otherwise winter in Guernsey can be birdingly dull.

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Of course it doesn't stop me getting out searching however, and the highlight of the quiet week was discovering a Water Pipit on the beach at L'Eree. There has been about 4 reported so far this autumn, so perhaps the wintering population is set to expand (or one is moving around a lot).

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Water Pipit - L'Eree Shingle Bank, 21 Nov 2011

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The habitat choice of the Water Pipits we are getting at the moment is curious. Just a short flit inland from this bird there are various wet marshes and flooded grassy areas which look ideal for Water Pipit, but most of the recent birds, like this one have been sticking to the rocky beaches, feeding in amongst the Rock Pipits. It must just be that the feeding is just so great there, with millions of insects in amongst the vraic, that they are happy to move out of usual habitat.

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Teal - Claire Mare, 23 Nov 2011

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Ringed Plover - early morning, Vazon Beach, 25 Nov 2011

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In the summer I bought an identification book on fungi to expand my knowledge of stuff that grows (and it was a steal at that price). The best time for fungi is the autumn, but the problem is during this time of year I don't hardly look down, as my eyes are always looking up for flyover migrants or for flicks in the bushes. Since it has quietened down though, I have photographed quite a few species whilst out and about, and have discovered that it is bloody hard! There seems to be endless types of 'agaric' species, all pretty much looking the same and trying to match the photos up with the book is a nightmare. I think I will have to be asking for help online for the ID of a lot of these. But there are still a few which are obvious though, and I saw these Candle Snuff Fungus this afternoon by the side of the road at Moulin Huet. It is amazing that when you start looking specifically for things, you wonder why you've never seen them before. Apparently, this species is common, but I have no recollection of seeing anything like it before.

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Candle Snuff Fungus - Moulin Huet, 27 Nov 11

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Categories: 2011 Autumn