Blog

Fri 21st May 2010

Posted on May 22, 2010 at 8:50 AM

birds : An unexpectedly exciting evening today. I had just pulled into the drive after collecting Abigail from Brownies and was just getting out of the car when I noticed a bird swoop in from behind the line of trees behind the house. It was immediately familiar, with its starling-like shape and triangular wings, flying very athletically and gracefully. It swooped in again and I was sure it was a Bee-eater, but it wasn't close enough to be certain. So I ran inside and grabbed my bins. I picked it up again just as it was landing on the highest twig of a nearby tree. The sun was shining, so its bright yellow throat stood out and its black bandit mask contrasted against this.

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Bee-eater - not the best drawing, but this is how I first saw it through the bins

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I then tried to shout to Abigail to get my camera as I tried to get the scope out of the car. Whilst doing this, the Bee-eater had been replaced by a Magpie, which had no doubt chased it off. Despite almost an hour of searching I never saw it again. This is the first Bee-eater I have seen for ages and ages and I've never seen one in Guernsey or even the UK. I've always dreamed of finding a Bee-eater but this cake didn't quite get any icing on it, as my views were far too brief.

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Earlier in the day I went to check on the Great Spotted Woodpecker nest site in my lunch hour. After a short while of waiting I heard a bird fly in and a male bird shot into the hole. It kept sticking its head out but I felt that it was aware of my presence and it was reluctant to leave. So after 20 mins I moved away so that it could go about its business in peace. This is only the second pair of Great Spots that have been discovered in Guernsey after last year's first pair.

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Great Spotted Woodpecker in nest hole

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moths : Called in at Rousse where there lots of small moths flying in the coastal grass, mostly Dichrorampha acuminatana, but also a few of Yellow Belle, Elachista argentella, Homoeosoma sinuella. Also at Fort Hommet there were a few Esperia sulphurella flying together.

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Elachista argentella - the common, tiny, white micro moth that is found mainly in the coastal grass

Categories: Self-found Rarities, 2010 Spring