Blog

Tue 24th August 2010

Posted on August 24, 2010 at 4:15 PM

birds : The last few days have been spent looking after the children and doing tasks at home so I have not been out searching for birds at all. Yesterday, I did go for a brief walk with Anais and we saw plenty of Willow Warblers but little else, but we did drive past a Ruff feeding on the saltmarsh at L'Eree which was a new species for the year.

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A Ruff feeding at L'Eree saltmarsh

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moths : A brief swing to southerly winds improved the situation slightly and resulted in two new species for the garden on the night of 20th/21st August. A Twin-spotted Wainscot was probably blown in from the reedbed at the Track Marais and perhaps the Clepsis spectrana was also.

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Twin-spotted Wainscot

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Clepsis spectrana (a.k.a Cyclamen Tortrix)

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One morning it was very wet in and around the moth trap as this Swallow Prominent shows. It is surprising to discover that there can be many moths flying in heavy rain, and this kind of weather doesn't seem to reduce the catch as much as the wind or cold does.

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You can see the reflection of my head in each of the water droplets as I took the photo.

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This Earwig was on the moth trap and then it suddenly seemed to change from brown to white! You can see the old skin just behind it so it had just moulted into this weird glass-like creature.

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nonsense : Well, yesterday I became a year older than I was - I have now been an adult for twenty years. Being 38 in football makes me a veteran, and 38 in birding makes me quite youngish, but 38 in mothing makes me an infant!

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The most chocolatty cake ever invented cooked by Rosie - muy delicioso!

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This book was a present and it is amazingly awesome. It is a bird identification book with no pictures. As it is an "advanced" ID guide it presumes that you know what you are looking at and it has bullet points that you can go through to check that you have seen all the salient features. Also very usefully, it specifies how to age and sex every single species which is not covered very well by most guides. A bird-geek's book and one I shall be taking out into the field whenever possible.

Categories: 2010 Summer