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Sat 17th September 2011

Posted on September 17, 2011 at 4:15 PM

With finding Osprey and Buff-breasted Sandpiper within three days, the rest of the week could not live up to such standards. On both Tuesday and Wednesday lunchtime I went down to L'Eree to search for the Tawny Pipit but it was nowhere to be seen. The saltmarsh there though was crawling with White and Pied Wagtails - much more than usual, but there was only one young Yellow Wagtail with them. The pipit had probably left in the calm, sunny conditions. The Little Stint was on the wader scrape but too distant to turn it into anything rarer. On Thursday morning I saw a Whinchat at Pulias which, upon checking, turned out to be the only one I have seen this year which is a bit odd. I usually see plenty in the Autumn.

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The most eventful morning was Tuesday when, after doing my usual pre-work circuit at Fort Hommet, I looked down from the hill and saw something odd stood in the grass near the car park.

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It didn't click at first but when I put my bins on it, I could see that it was a Shag - not exactly a typical grassland species. I went over to it and it was clearly a touch confused and allowed a close approach. It was very windy still and I think it must have crash-landed - perhaps it couldn't see where the sea was because of the wall. I thought it may have been injured.

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I was just starting to think "oh crap, I'm gonna have to try and rescue this aren't I ", when further down the path I saw a massive Doberman coming in our direction. Now this dog, which I regularly pass on a morning, frightens the hell out of me - it is the most gigantic beast of an animal that I've ever seen - it wouldn't look out of place patrolling the River Styx. The other day I heard it running towards me from behind and it sounded like a small racehorse pounding down the turf. To be fair, the owner seems to have it really well trained, but I didn't want to take any chances, so I started flapping my arms about trying to "mush" the Shag away, back towards the sea. Luckily it didn't seem injured at all and it made numerous short flappy flights towards the sea wall.

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When it reached the sea wall it looked like it didn't know where to go next (birds are so thick!) but luckily it decided to jump up onto the top of the wall.

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As it seemed safe I took the opportunity for a few pictures and was pleased to see it fly back into the water. So a successful rescue of a stupid bird.

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The late summer and early autumn has been atrocious for getting the moth trap due to the high winds . On Thursday I saw a few Silver Y whilst out and about, and that evening, I saw a tortrix moth on the outside of our bedroom window. I was pretty sure it was Acleris emargana initially from the strange shape of the forewings, which would have been a garden first. But once I got it inside, it clearly wasn't, and the nearest I can get is Acleris logiana which would be even better. Still need to confirm it though but a nice surprise.

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probable Acleris logiana - garden, 15 Sep 11

Categories: 2011 Autumn